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Bike theft stinks [UPDATE!]

"Biking has allowed me to convert to a year-round bike commuter and ultimately sell my car. For me, biking represents freedom from traffic, daily fresh air and muscle movement, and my commitment to reducing my impact on the environment." 

 

By Jennifer Yeatts, Director of Coffee

I got my bike back! 

Thank you to the Traverse City Police Department, GT County Sheriff Department, The Minervini Group, and good neighbors at Earthen Ales for contributing to its recovery, which was discovered by police late last week in a vacant building here in the Commons. While the custom rack and fenders, front and rear lights, and my bell were all stripped off, the bike is rideable and I look forward to giving it some TLC. Thank you, also, to everyone who shared the original post and stayed on the lookout for the past week. P.S., I now have a lock that can't be cut.

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(original post from 2/23/17)

My bike was stolen yesterday. I got to work just before 9 AM and locked it up to the rack, like I always do. I didn’t give it a second thought, because I never do. I’ve been biking to work for years, always taking the precaution of locking it up even though I generally have faith in people. Traverse City is a smallish town; there is a lively biking community and I’ve always felt safe and secure.

Around 3:30 PM, I strolled down the walkway to an empty bike rack and was momentarily confused. Did I park it in the garage? Did someone move it? Nobody else has a key. The lock was nowhere in sight, nor was my helmet, which had been hanging on my handlebars. Not a trace.

I spent the rest of the afternoon and much of the evening filing a police report, posting on social media, and combing Craigslist and eBay for anything resembling my Framed Wolf Trax fat tire bicycle (shown above), the vehicle that has allowed me to convert to a year-round bike commuter and ultimately sell my car. For me, biking represents freedom from traffic, daily fresh air and muscle movement, and my commitment to reducing my impact on the environment. Even more so in the winter, when I have often leaned on my fuel-consuming vehicle more often than not, allowing time constraints or simple laziness (who likes shoveling driveways?) to keep me from using my own two feet to get me from one side of town to the other.

I’m thankful for all the folks who immediately shared the Facebook posts with a photo of the bike, and to the TC police department who responded promptly to my call and filed a report (and even gave me a ride home in the squad car). Traverse City has way more kind-hearted and generous people than crummy ones, and I’m hopeful that with enough vigilance, my bike might turn up. In the grand scheme of things, it is just a bike. I’m humbled by the many kind words and vigilance of people I’ve never met who are now on the lookout. And to all you fellow bikers out there: get a U-lock.